TWITTER: The controversial decision that has left Cardiff fans disgusted and probably a bit depressed too

TWITTER: The controversial decision that has left Cardiff fans disgusted and probably a bit depressed too

Cardiff Blues’ hopes of making the Pro14 playoffs were dashed on Saturday as they went down 29-22 to Connacht at The Sportsground.

The win ensured the Irish outfit make the playoffs, but it was a victory that was marred with controversy, which has caused outrage on Twitter.

With the Blues trailing by 14 points, winger Jason Harries scored a try in the corner with 20 minutes remaining, which was eventually ruled out by the TMO. Cardiff mounted a comeback in the final ten minutes, but the disallowed try would have completely changed the balance of the game, and could have given John Mulvihill’s side the win, and changed the complexion of their season entirely.

TMO decisions do prove very contentious sometimes, however, this particular decision has received a lot of criticism from fans on Twitter. While it was adjudicated that the winger’s hand was in touch in goal, there is an abundance of fans that disagree. The overwhelming consensus from fans, not just from Cardiff, is that it was a try, and they have vented their anger on Twitter.

This is what they have said in light of the decision:

This decision has ostensibly caused indignation from Cardiff fans, but they believe this is symptomatic of something much more serious. Many fans are accusing the Pro14 of bias towards the Irish sides, particularly as the TMO was Irish.
Some have come out and defended the TMO, saying Harries’ little finger was on the flag and potentially in touch, but many Cardiff fans have quickly reiterated that the flag is obsolete in rugby. Many Blues fans, and indeed Welsh fans in general, remain adamant that this is a case of bias.

This is an issue that is likely to be raised again, and while some may say this is a case of sour grapes, it is understandable that many fans feel hard done by, as it is hard to see how that try was disallowed.